Tag Archives: learning & educational opportunities

When Words Collided in Calgary

Congratulations on a successful convention for everyone involved in When Words Collide. What did I learn? I am an experienced writer, but still, I learned far too much to cover today.  However, some of it will be subjects for blogs of the future. Many thanks to presenters and volunteers.

One very important detail that I learned from casual conversations was  that anyone interested in the conference must register early. In fact, some of us registered at this year’s conference for next year! I haven’t done proper fact-checking but I understand that, despite about 600 attendees, another hundred were on the waiting list . Obviously, my earlier blog was far to late to give you a chance of getting in the door! So, watch the When Words Collide website http://www.whenwordscollide.org for when registrations are open to the public for the 2016 conference.

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When Words Matter

You still might have time to attend When Words Collide in Calgary. For the August 14-16 writers’ conference, registering early was important. In fact, if you email now, you will be put on the waiting list! But at least you have a chance of attending.

Wordfest celebrations do have presentations for writers, but this conference is truly a great one for writers or those who dream of writing. As well, given the range of topics and the expertise, what phenomenal value for your money!

Having participated previously, I remember the countless presentations and panels on the art, craft and business of writing. Whether you have published or are still hoping to publish, the weekend offers something for everyone regardless of expertise and genre. If you want the scoop on events and presenters, just check out the program on the website: http://www.whenwordscollide.org.

There are so many great panels and presentations, but I will be on the following panels with these other fine presenters:

Editing Tricks Faye Holt, Ella Beaumont, Nowick Gray, Arlene F. Marks, Barb Galler-Smith (M) Catching your own goofs before you send your manuscript to your beta reader, or worse, Amazon. Developmental, structural, copyediting or proofreading: Do you need an editor before you self publish? What kind? Or have you been burned: I’m not going to let an editor touch my words!

To Blog or Not to Blog: Answer This Question Faye Holt, Maraya Loza Koxahn, Ella Beaumont, Ryan McFadden Should writers spend their little time writing their book or splitting it with a consistent blog. Panellists discuss benefits and best practices to hosting a blog.

Memoir or Autobiography?  Brian Brennan, Faye Holt, Vivian Hansen, Maraya Loza Koxahn Should your memoir start with your birth? Or is that your mother’s story? Memoir focuses on a significant event or series of events that illustrate a concept. Or do they? Panellists discuss what to include and what to leave out of memoir: the line between memoir and autobiography.

If you have registered, check the schedule for dates and times. Hope to see you there.

Authors in Schools: What’s the Best Match for You?

Whether you are a teacher or an artist, it’s wise to get a sense of how programs work. Long before any planned visits, writers and artists need to think about what they will offer to students, and teachers must evaluate how guest presentations will fit with their goals for students.

Browse the websites as soon as new information is posted. Both Young Alberta Book Society and the Canadian Authors Association Writers in Schools Program provide links to the websites of participating authors and artists. Follow those links, and the web will open up a world of further information.  While teachers will be researching possible guests, authors and artists will find countless ideas for programs.

Just as artists are wise to begin with grade levels where they will be comfortable, teachers should look for writers, illustrators and story tellers who will enhance their own programs concerning both content and approaches to learning and writing. For instance, writers of horror, science fiction and romance may have written great work, but only the teachers will know if that work is the most suitable genre for their students. Some schools prefer to “shelter” students; others may wish to focus on presenting the widest array of possibilities from the artistic world.

The WISP webpage is part of the Alberta Branch of the Canadian Authors’ website. As such, it does go off line between periods of author and school registration. So, for spring presentations, be sure to check the website during the previous fall.

The YABS website is an especially fabulous resource that is available all year long.  It offers a page suggesting additional teacher resources, publications and writing contests for kids, and it provides links to other relevant programs. For instance, in partnership with business, the society has also developed Wordpower, special week-long tours generally in March for southern Alberta and in April for northern Alberta.

Writers and artists must realize that there is a greater chance of being invited into an elementary school than into a junior or senior high school. Writers are sometimes invited to speak to Grade Ten or Grade Eleven students, but there is little likelihood of being invited into a Grade Twelve classroom. The reasons are logical. Generally speaking, elementary teachers have more flexibility in their course matter and approaches, while Grade Twelve teachers are working hard to prepare students for the rigorous exams that can determine what further education and career opportunities are available to those students. As well, parents are more involved in fundraising at the elementary school level. Later, their teenagers prefer independence to parental involvement at school, but fundraising is often necessary if a school is to fund author visits.

Those authors who hope to visit elementary schools should take note that younger students have shorter attention spans, and attention span needs to be part of program planning. Younger students benefit from varied approaches to learning, and sometimes they even prefer to tell their own stories rather than listen to the stories of adults. So presenters might consider how to encourage discussion as well as how to assist students in moving ahead to new materials or concepts.

Writers and other artists in schools are often able to provide the extra inspiration and motivation that helps make all students become keen learners. Both the YABS and WISP author programs have fine strengths. So, choose what’s best for you, and plan to participate.

Young Alberta Book Society (YABS) & Writers in Schools Program (WISP): Planning Ahead

For teachers, timeframes for author tours are important, and dates can become a deciding factor. Some school calendars follow the traditional school year; others operate on a semester system; some schedule classes over the summer. Professional development days, parent-teacher interviews, statutory and religious holidays all affect when it is most convenient to host an author.

Timeframes are important to writers and artists, too. For instance, some simply cannot participate in YABS Wordpower tours because they are scheduled in March and April. Other participating artists who are “emerging” in their fields need extra time to prepare material before going into schools. Also, mental preparedness is essential, and newbies benefit from talking to those who have toured in the programs.

Both teachers and touring artists learn from viewing the websites of numerous authors. In countless cases, these experienced individuals know what works and what doesn’t work in schools. As well, before signing up as a host or presenter, consider suitability for specific grade levels. Touring artists should begin with grades where they feel comfortable, whether that be kindergarten or high school, and school organizers new to the role of hosting should see how the process works with a few classes before determining that they will offer everyone in the school an opportunity to “see the writer.”

Likely, teachers or teaching teams will prefer the spring or fall for Alberta author and artist visits. For WISP, member writers update their information and availability by the end of September. School organizers can view the information by mid-October, and by then, the deadline for applications to host authors are posted. Usually, that deadline will be about the end of November but it can change every year. Also, demand exceeds availability and funding. So, schools should apply as early as possible. Participating authors present in schools from February to mid-May. All follow-up paperwork must be to the WISP co-ordinator by the end of May.

Those YABS members who are planning to tour update their information and availability in March. The updated content is available throughout the year on the website, and school organizers can begin booking visiting authors in May for the fall.  With many, many visiting artists who live throughout the province and are willing to travel to schools, finding the best guests for your school may take time, despite the ability to search specific types of artists and specific grade levels. Also, the school registration form allows organizers to select their first three guest preferences.

Next year might be the perfect year to participate as a host or visiting artist. So, begin now. Check out the websites: www.yabs.ab.ca and www.albertaauthors.ab.ca Plan, plan, plan, and success will be inevitable.